This Week in the Unwritten Rules

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

April 26
In light of the debate about youngster Dallas Braden’s propriety in calling out Alex Rodriguez, we look at some instances of players verbally overstepping their bounds.

April 27
Mark Teixeira annihilated Angels catcher Bobby Wilson in a play at the plate. Was he within his rights? You be the judge.

April 28
There are proper and improper methods of “deking,” or throwing phantom (decoy) tags down on unsuspecting base runners. In a game against Philadelphia, Giants shortstop Edgar Renteria deked Ryan Howard perfectly.

April 29
An unwritten rule prohibits teammates from speaking ill of each other in the press. You wouldn’t know it by Dodgers GM Ned Colletti, but the same holds true for management.

April 29
Chris Tillman, a Triple-A pitcher in the Orioles system, no-hit the Gwinnett Braves. In the fifth inning, he said in the Baltimore Sun’s Orioles Insider blog, “I looked up and noticed what was going on, and then I started noticing my teammates were sitting farther and farther away from me in the dugout, giving me the cold shoulder.”

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2 thoughts on “This Week in the Unwritten Rules

  1. Wilson should be pissed. I caught in my youth and noone ever cheapshoted me when I was defensless. Now that being said, if I’m the baserunner, and he has the plate blocked, I’m gonna try to put him into the first row of the stands. If I’m the catcher he cannot be allowed to reach the plate. Just a little lower body springing up under his chin, into his chest is where I’m aiming. Never attack a defensless fielder, although I would expect it from the Yankees.

    1. You say yourself that if the catcher has the plate blocked you’d put him in the first row of the stands. Wilson did have the plate blocked — he just didn’t have the ball. Teixeira made his move based entirely off Wilson’s body language, which, unfortunately, involved turning across the plate, even as the ball bounced away.

      – Jason

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