Bat Flipping

Flipping Out, World Series Edition

Correa flips

It wouldn’t be a World Series presented by YouTube TV Yasiel Puig without talk of bat flipping and impertinence in the face of Baseball Propriety. In Game 2, however, it was not Puig flinging his bat around—despite having hit a timely, monster home run—but Astros shortstop Carlos Correa, who’s not known for such things.

Given the chance, in fact, Puig offered an anti-flip, gently laying down his lumber after his almost-game-saving homer leading off the 10th.

It was almost certainly in reaction to Correia, who a half-inning earlier had given Houston a 5-3 lead after going back-to-back with Jose Altuve.

Puig has long since won the battle to bring this type of showboating into the mainstream. Where he truly shined yesterday was in his postgame comments about Correa’s display.

“I loved it,” Puig told reporters. “It was a little bit higher than the bat flips I normally do. He was happy, and that’s the way you should play in the World Series. Not everybody gets to play in a place like this.”

Puig has long asserted this let’s-play-joyously message when it comes to his own on-field drama. Being consistent in the position as regards the opposition earns him additional credibility.

“Like a friend of mine once said, I don’t know why my bats are so slippery,” Correa said after the game in an MLB.com report, jokingly about both his flip and Puig.

People who still begrudge these guys their moments are living in a bygone era. Time to get with the program.

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2 thoughts on “Flipping Out, World Series Edition

  1. Jeers to Fox for not showing or having a better view of the flip. Get with the program.
    The Astros have a free pass to flip bats as high and far as they want and no Dodger can complain. I wonder if any of them are annoyed about that.

    1. I’m sure there are annoyed players in the Dodgers dugout, just as there are likely annoyed players in every dugout, but they have little choice but to keep quiet. At this point, it’s kind of like a pitcher using pine tar. Opponents usually won’t call it out even if they notice it, because they more than likely have somebody on their own staff doing the same thing. It’s a can of worms simply not worth opening. Thus has bat flipping joined the mainstream.

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