This Week in the Unwritten Rules

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

May 10
Dallas Braden’s perfect game would have been markedly less perfect had Evan Longoria gotten his bunt down in the fifth inning. Should he have tried it in the first place?

May 11
Josh Beckett went nuts against the Yankees, throwing fastball after fastball at or near multiple players. Was it unintentional? Does it matter?

May 12
The Phillies own both a pair of binoculars and an allegedly powerful hunger to see what the other team is up to behind the plate.

May 12
Nap-gate hit the Mariners clubhouse hard. The real issue, however, isn’t Ken Griffey Jr.’s sleep habits, it’s who’s leaking sensitive information to the media.

May 13
It’s not like the Phillies haven’t been accused of sign stealing before. Like, last October, by Yankees fans.

May 14
Chris Carpenter is proving to have a weak spot when it comes to perceived disrespect. Turns out there is such thing as too much devotion to the unwritten rules.

– Jason

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This Week in the Unwritten Rules

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

May 3
Pirates starter Zach Duke failed to respond when Dodgers reliever Ramon Ortiz threw two pitches at Andrew McCutchen—one at his head. Realizing the potential for disaster, he immediately owned up to his oversight, in a most public manner.

May 4
An additional wrinkle for the Zach Duke situation concerned whether he should have been instructed by manager John Russell to carry out the deed.

May 4
I wrote a piece for Yahoo Sports, detailing 10 of the lesser-known unwritten rules.

May 5
Milton Bradley
quit on his teammates, leaving the ballpark after being pulled from a game—while the game was still going on. There are few more effective means of losing clubhouse support.

May 6
Dallas Braden weighed in on the Alex Rodriguez mound-crossing affair once again, this time on video.

May 6
ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick talked to three prominent pitchers about how they’d respond should various unwritten rules be broken on their watch.

May 6
Anaheim’s Howie Kendrick bunted in the game-winning run in the 12th inning against Cleveland. Not every member of the Indians appreciated it.

May 7
Washington’s Scott Olsen had a no-hitter through seven innings against Atlanta. Then the Braves requested that the grounds crew tamp down the mound. Did it distract him? Two batters later, he gave up a hit.

May 7
Morgan Ensberg discusses a novel way to relay pitch selection from second base, and it has nothing to do with stealing signs from the catcher.

– Jason

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

April 26
In light of the debate about youngster Dallas Braden’s propriety in calling out Alex Rodriguez, we look at some instances of players verbally overstepping their bounds.

April 27
Mark Teixeira annihilated Angels catcher Bobby Wilson in a play at the plate. Was he within his rights? You be the judge.

April 28
There are proper and improper methods of “deking,” or throwing phantom (decoy) tags down on unsuspecting base runners. In a game against Philadelphia, Giants shortstop Edgar Renteria deked Ryan Howard perfectly.

April 29
An unwritten rule prohibits teammates from speaking ill of each other in the press. You wouldn’t know it by Dodgers GM Ned Colletti, but the same holds true for management.

April 29
Chris Tillman, a Triple-A pitcher in the Orioles system, no-hit the Gwinnett Braves. In the fifth inning, he said in the Baltimore Sun’s Orioles Insider blog, “I looked up and noticed what was going on, and then I started noticing my teammates were sitting farther and farther away from me in the dugout, giving me the cold shoulder.”

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

April 19
Vicente Padilla broke Aaron Rowand’s face with a pitch. Manny Ramirez came out for a curtain call while the opposing pitcher was in the middle of his delivery. Was either instance retribution-worthy? You decide.

April 20
One has to learn the unwritten rules at some point. To judge by this no-hitter story, high school is not the place where it happens.

April 20
Broadcasters talking about a no-hitter as it happens (or not talking about it, in many cases) continues to be a point of contention with fans.

April 22
Chris Carpenter became the first pitcher in memory to retaliate for an offense (in this case, D-Backs pitcher Edwin Jackson hitting him on the wrist with a pitch) not from the mound, but on the basepaths.

April 22
Alex Rodriguez crossed the pitcher’s mound in Oakland on his way back to first base. Pitcher Dallas Braden made sure that A-Rod knew exactly what he did wrong.

April 23
Does Dallas Braden even have the big league bona fides to call out a superstar like A-Rod? In some cases, absolutely not. In this case, yes.

April 24
Baseball writer Allen Barra disagrees with the assertions set forth in this blog. This blog attempts to set him straight.

– Jason