This Week in the Unwritten Rules

This Week in the Unwritten Rules

May 3
Pirates starter Zach Duke failed to respond when Dodgers reliever Ramon Ortiz threw two pitches at Andrew McCutchen—one at his head. Realizing the potential for disaster, he immediately owned up to his oversight, in a most public manner.

May 4
An additional wrinkle for the Zach Duke situation concerned whether he should have been instructed by manager John Russell to carry out the deed.

May 4
I wrote a piece for Yahoo Sports, detailing 10 of the lesser-known unwritten rules.

May 5
Milton Bradley
quit on his teammates, leaving the ballpark after being pulled from a game—while the game was still going on. There are few more effective means of losing clubhouse support.

May 6
Dallas Braden weighed in on the Alex Rodriguez mound-crossing affair once again, this time on video.

May 6
ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick talked to three prominent pitchers about how they’d respond should various unwritten rules be broken on their watch.

May 6
Anaheim’s Howie Kendrick bunted in the game-winning run in the 12th inning against Cleveland. Not every member of the Indians appreciated it.

May 7
Washington’s Scott Olsen had a no-hitter through seven innings against Atlanta. Then the Braves requested that the grounds crew tamp down the mound. Did it distract him? Two batters later, he gave up a hit.

May 7
Morgan Ensberg discusses a novel way to relay pitch selection from second base, and it has nothing to do with stealing signs from the catcher.

– Jason

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “This Week in the Unwritten Rules

  1. Robinson Cano just violated rule #1 against Jon Lester: swang at first pitch after back-to-back homers to Swisher and A-Rod. I’m wondering, does the rule not apply if the hitter’s team is down 6-2, or does it just not apply to Yankees?

    1. Except he didn’t. Mark Teixeira struck out between the home runs by Swisher and Rodriguez.

      Would have been a good story to chase, though . . .

      – Jason

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s